Daylighting Simulation at Four Architecture Firms

This Greenbuild 2015 presentation was published on Feb 2, 2015.

How do firms start a daylight simulation program in-house, how do they run it, integrate with project schedules, and use it to make better design decisions? Leading practitioners within four architecture firms will answer each of these in a rapid fire session that shows how great spaces get designed, informed by daylight simulation. In addition, LMN Architects, Mahlum, Callison, and Skidmore, Ownings and Merrill will each present case studies showing how daylight simulation was an integral part of the design discussion and decisions. Successful daylight simulation requires a balance between the quantity and quality of daylight. While LEED has criteria for ‘success,’ firms that use daylight simulation begin to understand how changing conditions throughout each hour, day, and year will interact with geometry and glazing properties to create too little, too much, the wrong kind of light conditions, or conditions that the design team intended. This information can be fed back into an energy model for more accurate energy use simulations, as many energy models do not adequately predict energy savings associated with daylight.

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Lisa Heshong at Carnegie Mellon 2014

LISA HESCHONG is Vice President and Chief Building Scientist for TRC Energy Services. Located in Sacramento California, Heschong spent 30 years as a registered architect, and has devoted her career to a balance between research, writing, and building design. She has served on the Board of Directors for the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) and as Chair of the IES Daylight Metrics Committee. She is especially well known for her research showing a link between daylight and student performance, and she was recently awarded the James Haecker Award for Distinguished Leadership in Architectural Research by the Architectural Research Centers Consortium. Heschong has a B. Sc. from UC Berkeley, a Master’s in Architecture from MIT, and is the author of Thermal Delight in Architecture. In her lecture, Heschong will review how the growing demand for more daylight in our workplaces intersects with building design: from architecture, to interior design, energy system engineering, landscape design and urban planning, and will discuss the responsibility of building professionals and the impact of their designs on both the planet and the well-being of the building occupants.